October 18

HAGERTY, CURRAN AND VUE

Sonia, Tony, Andrzej and Greg look at Autoportrait (2015) by Marie Hagerty

Sonia, Tony, Andrzej and Greg look at Autoportrait (2015) by Marie Hagerty

Speaking both artistically and socially you simply can’t go wrong with shows by Marie Hagerty, Tony Curran and Vanghoua Anthony Vue. All at different stages of what are, or will be, spectacular careers –  each is exploring their respective media in ways as exciting as anyone in this whole sunburnt country (not that there has been much of that lately). Rather than try to explain there are some quotes blow from CCAS Director David Broker that eloquently capture the essence of the shows. But before we get serious the social secretary gives a big thumbs up for an opening where many rules were broken. Thanks to Alex for being so extremely entertaining, Sabrina for her patience and getting pizzas at a difficult time of the evening, and thanks to Tom, Josh, Alycia, Kon and Yan for being so great on the bar again. The opening was also attended by art glitterati from far and wide including Marie’s dealer Tim Olsen (OlsenIrwin Gallery), Michael Edwards (Contemporary Art Tasmania) and Dr Melentie Pandilovski (Riddoch Art Gallery, Mount Gambier).

The Artists

Reminiscent of Modigliani’s voluptuousness stripped of figurative connotation, Marie Hagerty‘s luxurious overlay of form and virtuoso use of colour is paradoxically best described as sculptural, and calls to mind the organic abstraction of Jean Arp. Separated tonally by line and colour, floating in, around and over each other, her merging and elegantly parting shapes are like the translucent liquids of a lava lamp as they begin to warm and perform. The epitome of lyricism, Hagerty’s paintings express the artist’s vision and imagination through the sublime beauty of harmonious form.

Tony Curran’s paintings are “transcribed” from the digital realm where his intitial encounter with the sitter is curiously photographic in that the process is partly mechanical. Digital colours are carefully matched to pigment colour in the production of compositions in which figuration and abstraction are delicately balanced and based on the “performance” that takes place during the making of a portrait. The movement of the subject might be incorporated into the image along with marks that represent a true rendition of the artist’s experience of meeting and engaging with the sitter. Thus the works have immediacy, a life that is communicated to the audience via the balance of colour, form and figuration.

Ci-Lines is an installation that story of Hmong refugees who fled to camps in Thailand in the aftermath of the Second Indochina War. Using fluorescent Builders Line on the four black walls of The Cube, Vanghoua Anthony Vue has drawn a map of the Phetchabun Refugee Camp, the last of its kind in Thailand. Before its closure a number of family members were interned in this camp and the installation recognises their suffering from a distinctly personal point of view. With pulsating ultra violet lighting the map is animated, resembling a living organism whose story is interpolated by a video screen, acrylic text panels and paper cut outs.

Blue Blooded, Almost Illegible and Ci-Lines at CCAS Gorman Art Centre until 19 November

Sara, Marie Hagerty and db

Sara, Marie Hagerty and db

Greg Hodge and Tony Curran

Greg Hodge and Tony Curran

Vanghoua Anthony Vue (R), Duong and Anthony's brother

Vanghoua Anthony Vue (R), Duong and Anthony’s bro from Yass

Andrej and Jay

Andrzej and Jay

Emma and Alex

Emma and Alex

Kael, Chris, Ben and Millan

Kael, Chris, Ben and Millan

Amy and Edward

Amy and Edward

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Peter, Tony and very nice friend

db and Tim Olsen

db and Tim Olsen (work by Marie Hagerty)

Shags and Annika

Shags and Annika

Michael and Mai

Michael and Mai

Andrej and Jay

Andrej and Jay

Joseph and Jan

Joseph and Jan (work by Tony Curran) 

Emma, Marie and Alex

Emma, Marie and Alex (work by Tony Curran) 

Cat and beau

Cat (R) and beau

Amy, Victoria

Amy and family

Riley

Riley